Eberly News

Articles for the month of August 2017

Kevin Daly

WVU biologists awarded $1.4 million Air Force grant to examine moths’ olfactory systems

As humans walk and talk, we sense our own movements or sounds. Yet, we can distinguish our actions from everything else in our environment that affects our senses.

Gabriel Fried, author of ‘The Children Are Reading,’ to give reading Sept. 5

The Department of English at West Virginia University will host a reading by Gabriel Fried on Tuesday, Sept. 5 at 7:30 p.m. in the Milano Room of the Downtown Campus Library.

Angel Tuninetti

WVU World Languages department chair receives Fulbright Specialist Grant

Ángel Tuninetti will travel to Paraguay this fall to build Spanish-language and culture programs for international students

A number of students beginning their academic career at WVU are embarking on a journey that no one in their families have before, becoming the first generation of their families to earn four-year degrees. 

That experience comes with unique challenges for students as they make their way through an unfamiliar culture with its own language and expectations. How do I talk to my professor? Can someone help me understand the syllabus? If I need tutoring, is it free?

Take heart, though. We’re here to help. What’s more, a number of faculty in the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences had the same experience. They too were once first-generation college students excited about the future, but anxious about asking for help and speaking up in class.

Meet Hal Gorby, teaching assistant professor of history.

First-Generation Faculty: Hal Gorby

A number of students beginning their academic career at WVU are embarking on a journey that no one in their families have before, becoming the first generation of their families to earn four-year degrees.

A number of students beginning their academic career at WVU are embarking on a journey that no one in their families have before, becoming the first generation of their families to earn four-year degrees. 

That experience comes with unique challenges for students as they make their way through an unfamiliar culture with its own language and expectations. How do I talk to my professor? Can someone help me understand the syllabus? If I need tutoring, is it free?

Take heart, though. We’re here to help. What’s more, a number of faculty in the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences had the same experience. They too were once first-generation college students excited about the future, but anxious about asking for help and speaking up in class.

Meet Michelle Richards-Babb, associate professor of chemistry and director of the Office of Undergraduate Research.

First-Generation Faculty: Michelle Richards-Babb

A number of students beginning their academic career at WVU are embarking on a journey that no one in their families have before, becoming the first generation of their families to earn four-year degrees.

Senator Jay Rockefeller

Jay Rockefeller and Sylvia Burwell to keynote WVU Children’s Health Policy Summit Sept. 7

As children’s access to quality and accessible health care is in uncertain times, West Virginia University’s John D. Rockefeller IV School of Politics and Policy  is partnering with the WVU Health Sciences Center and WVU Libraries to host a Children’s Health Policy Summit: Understanding the People, Place and Policy Behind Health Care. 

Almost every 18 months, a total solar eclipse is visible to some part of the world. However, the United States hasn’t had a total solar eclipse since 1994. For the first time during the 21st century, a total solar eclipse, will be visible across the United States on Monday, Aug. 21. 

To help prepare the community for the “Great American Eclipse,” the West Virginia University Planetarium is hosting a pre-eclipse event from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Aug. 19.

WVU Planetarium and Observatory to host pre-eclipse event Aug. 19

Almost every 18 months, a total solar eclipse is visible to some part of the world. However, the United States hasn’t had a total solar eclipse since 1994. For the first time during the 21st century, a total solar eclipse will be visible across the United States on Monday, Aug. 21.  

A number of students beginning their academic career at WVU are embarking on a journey that no one in their families have before, becoming the first generation of their families to earn four-year degrees. 

That experience comes with unique challenges for students as they make their way through an unfamiliar culture with its own language and expectations. How do I talk to my professor? Can someone help me understand the syllabus? If I need tutoring, is it free?

Take heart, though. We’re here to help. What’s more, a number of faculty in the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences had the same experience. They too were once first-generation college students excited about the future, but anxious about asking for help and speaking up in class.

Meet Earl Scime, associate professor and chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

First-Generation Faculty: Earl Scime

A number of students beginning their academic career at WVU are embarking on a journey that no one in their families have before, becoming the first generation of their families to earn four-year degrees. 

A number of students beginning their academic career at WVU are embarking on a journey that no one in their families have before, becoming the first generation of their families to earn four-year degrees. 

That experience comes with unique challenges for students as they make their way through an unfamiliar culture with its own language and expectations. How do I talk to my professor? Can someone help me understand the syllabus? If I need tutoring, is it free?

Take heart, though. We’re here to help. What’s more, a number of faculty in the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences had the same experience. They too were once first-generation college students excited about the future, but anxious about asking for help and speaking up in class.

First-Generation Faculty: Nicholas Turiano

Raised by a blue-collar family in Philadelphia, Pa., Turiano's father worked for Verizon, climbing into sewers and up telephone poles fixing phone lines for 40 years. Watching how proud his father was of his work and how he supported his family without a college degree, Turiano dreamed of following in his father’s footsteps. It wasn’t until later in high school when a friend convinced him to apply to college instead of working for Verizon.