Eberly News

Tagged with " Communication Studies "

A new West Virginia University research collaborative is working to address the many challenging conditions facing the state and Appalachia. 

In the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences Interdisciplinary Research Collaborative for a Safe and Healthy Society, researchers from a wide range of disciplines are working together with partners across campus to seek solutions to these pressing issues.

The collaborative brings together faculty, staff and students who work in communities around the state in areas like community development, substance use prevention and treatment, drug policy, healthcare policy, medical sociology and crime.

Planting seeds for a safe and healthy society

A new WVU research collaborative is working to address the many challenging conditions facing the state and Appalachia. In the Eberly College's Interdisciplinary Research Collaborative for a Safe and Healthy Society, researchers from a wide range of disciplines are working together with partners across campus to seek solutions to these pressing issues.

With the COVID-19 pandemic upending life as we know it, researchers in West Virginia University’s Eberly College of Arts and Sciences are taking quick action to study how people from Appalachia to Europe are responding to the pressure this crisis has placed on their communities.

A rapid research response to COVID-19’s effect on communities

With the COVID-19 pandemic upending life as we know it, Eberly College researchers are taking quick action to study how people from Appalachia to Europe are responding to the pressure this crisis has placed on their communities.

WVU’s Eberly College announces 2019-2020 Outstanding Faculty Awards

WVU’s Eberly College announces 2019-2020 Outstanding Faculty Awards

The Eberly College has named recipients for its 2019-2020 Outstanding Teacher, Researcher and Service awards.

A group of students, studying everything from criminology to creative writing, are working together to make a difference and find purpose in their careers.

A new Social Justice Research Fellowship in West Virginia University’s Eberly College of Arts and Sciences is empowering graduate students to connect their research to social justice issues.

Weaving social justice into graduate studies

A group of students, studying everything from criminology to creative writing, are working together to make a difference and find purpose in their careers.

Researchers from West Virginia University are preserving the memories of a coal community through oral history and photography. 

Supported by a grant from the WVU Humanities Center, the research team used historical images from the West Virginia and Regional History Center’s online photographs database, West Virginia History OnView, to document the history of the Scott’s Run community in Monongalia County.

Keeping the memories alive

WVU researchers preserve the memories of Scott's Run through new oral history project.

Four West Virginia University faculty members, all in the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences, have received grants from the U.S. Fulbright Scholar Program to conduct research abroad.

The recipients are:
•	Nicholas Bowman, Associate Professor of Communication Studies 
•	Jay Krehbiel, Assistant Professor of Political Science 
•	Tamba M’Bayo, Associate Professor of History
•	Ángel Tuninetti, Professor of Spanish

Four WVU professors awarded Fulbright grants

Four West Virginia University faculty members, all in the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences, have received grants from the U.S. Fulbright Scholar Program to conduct research abroad.

West Virginia University student Kylie Wilson is using her research on health campaigns to improve the lives of individuals who suffer from mental illness.

WVU student using trip abroad to further health campaign research

West Virginia University student Kylie Wilson is using her research on health campaigns to improve the lives of individuals who suffer from mental illness.

WVU researchers to study Fallout 76 gamers' perceptions of West Virginia

WVU researchers to study Fallout 76 gamers' perceptions of West Virginia

Through the coming weeks, video gamers will be blasting away mutated monsters, exploring nuked country roads and rebuilding America, a noble duty that begins in virtual West Virginia. 

Video games and interactive media like the Fallout series and Fortnite, which is currently one of the nation’s most popular games, have interested Nick Bowman, associate professor in the Department of Communication Studies and a research associate of WVU’s Interaction Lab, for years. Growing up around interactive media such as video games, Bowman has been researching how people experience and interact with video games and other virtual environments.

Not ‘just for kids’: WVU communication studies professor researches the interactivity of video games

WVU communication studies professor researches the interactivity of video games

The MARIA Project, or Moral Agency in Robot-human InterActions, is funded by a three-year, $730,000 award from the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research. In that project, Banks is investigating people’s ideas about machines’ moral agency, meaning the ability to consider right and wrong and act on that consideration. This study emerged from her extensive work on player-avatar relationships in video games.

Air Force funds WVU research on morality in human-robot interactions

“The mediator between the head and the hands must be the heart,” says Maria, the working class advocate-turned machine in Fritz Lang’s 1927 film, “Metropolis.”