Eberly News

Physicist explores science behind smartphones

The computer, and the devices that use them, are considered one of the biggest success stories of modern physics. 

Astrophysicist part of team that has created most detailed map of Milky Way

Hydrogen. Atomic number 1. It is the simplest and lightest element on the periodic table, but don’t be fooled by its humble appearance. With just a single proton and a single electron it is the most abundant element in the universe and has fueled star formation for the past 13 billion years.

Did you know? Department of Physics and Astronomy home to several scientists exploring Nobel Prize-related research

Earlier this week, three researchers from the University of Washington, Princeton University and Brown University were named 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics recipients, for revealing what the organization called “secrets of exotic matter.” But did you know that WVU is home to a number of experts in topology, materials science and condensed matter physics?

'little green men' to premiere Sept. 29

No, it isn’t about aliens. While the title of the upcoming documentary “little green men” suggests an extra-terrestrial theme, it actually features life in our own backyard.

Colin Komar

Alumni Spotlight: Colin Komar

Briefly, describe your career path.

Cassak

WVU physicist helps hone in on what sparks one of the most explosive processes in the universe

Scientists are making new discoveries about a process that causes some of the most explosive events in the universe. At the same time, they are answering questions about Earth’s magnetosphere – the protective bubble around Earth that shields the planet from the sun’s constant barrage of superheated, electrically charged particles.

Figure Credit: Danielle Futselaar — The 305-m Arecibo telescope and its suspended support platform of radio receivers is shown amid a starry night. From space, a sequence of millisecond-duration radio flashes are racing towards the dish, where they will be reflected and detected by the radio receivers. Such radio signals are called fast radio bursts, and Arecibo is the first telescope to see repeat bursts from the same source.

WVU astrophysicist part of research team that discovers mysterious cosmic radio bursts are found to repeat

Figure Credit: Danielle Futselaar — The 305-m Arecibo telescope and its suspended support platform of radio receivers is shown amid a starry night. From space, a sequence of millisecond-duration radio flashes are racing towards the dish, where they will be reflected and detected by the radio receivers. Such radio signals are called fast radio bursts, and Arecibo is the first telescope to see repeat bursts from the same source.A global team of astronomers, including one from  West Virginia University, have for the first time detected repeating short-duration bursts of radio waves from an enigmatic source which is likely located well beyond the edge of the Milky Way galaxy. The findings indicate that these “fast radio bursts,” or FRBs, come from an extremely powerful object which occasionally produces multiple bursts in under a minute.