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Environmental Geoscience

Do you have an interest in environmental issues? A desire to change the world around you? If so, environmental geosciences is the program for you. Students interested in geological and geographical approaches to environmental issues study how to positively affect the environment and find solutions to the problems around them. 

Geologists and geophysicists hold approximately 85,000 jobs nationwide. In addition, nearly 10,000 geoscientists hold geology, geophysics and oceanography faculty positions in colleges and universities. Energy and environmental companies employ about half of all geoscientists. Many other geologists work for consulting firms and business services, especially engineering firms, which often provide services to oil and gas companies. The federal government employs approximately 10,000 geologists, geophysicists, oceanographers and hydrologists.

How will I focus my studies?

Emphasis is placed on the physical, human and spatial aspects of Earth and its environment. The broad and interdisciplinary nature of the program is designed to produce geoscientists who can identify environmental problems, apply a variety of approaches to their remediation and be conversant among the wide range of disciplines for whom the environment is of special concern.

Lacey Smith, Fairmont, W.Va.

Major: Environmental Geoscience
LaceyOut-of-class experiences helped Lacey Smith narrow down her career goals. “Taking field trips to the (Core Arboretum) and other local areas with my  environmental biology class got me excited for a career in the natural sciences.” Lacey also traveled to Maine to study ecology as part of her internship with the  Department of Biology. The interdisciplinary nature of the environmental  geoscience major has prepared her for her future career goal, conducting research with the Environmental Protection Agency. “I believe environmental geoscience is the right amount of geology, geography and biology all wrapped up into one degree. I highly recommend this major if you enjoy the outdoors and want a more  environmental perspective on geology.” 

Learn more at the Environmental Geoscience site