Eberly News

Fredrickson

WVU Psychology to host leading social psychology scholar April 20 and 21

The West Virginia University Department of Psychology will host Barbara L. Fredrickson, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, on April 20 and 21 for lectures on the power of positivity.

Rachael Woldoff

Sociologist studies affordable housing, community, and the lives of New York City’s middle class in new book

Between 14th and 23rd streets in New York City lies an 80-acre community along the East River called Stuyvesant Town.

A WVU biology professor asks: How do electric fish process signal patterns?

Research on fish may lead to breakthroughs in neuroscience and how sensory information is processed.

WVU Eberly College announces 2016 Outstanding Teacher Award recipients

The West Virginia University Eberly College of Arts and Sciences has named five recipients of the 2016 Outstanding Teacher Award: Nicholas Bowman, Patrick Hickey, Karen Kunz, Philip Michelbach and Jill Higgins Woods.

Geography students featured on Talkline with Hoppy Kercheval

Metronews Talkline with Hoppy Kercheval recently featured two students from the  West Virginia University  Department of Geology and Geography and the  West Virginia Geographic Information Science (GIS) Technical Center and their ongoing work to create a digital database for engineering plans for West Virginia roadways.

Mary L. Thomas Lecture Series to feature University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Professor Dov Cohen

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology has announced that Dov Cohen, the next speaker in the Mary L. Thomas Lecture series, will present “Honor, Dignity, and Face” March 14 at 4:00 p.m. in Ming Hsieh 122.

Figure Credit: Danielle Futselaar — The 305-m Arecibo telescope and its suspended support platform of radio receivers is shown amid a starry night. From space, a sequence of millisecond-duration radio flashes are racing towards the dish, where they will be reflected and detected by the radio receivers. Such radio signals are called fast radio bursts, and Arecibo is the first telescope to see repeat bursts from the same source.

WVU astrophysicist part of research team that discovers mysterious cosmic radio bursts are found to repeat

Figure Credit: Danielle Futselaar — The 305-m Arecibo telescope and its suspended support platform of radio receivers is shown amid a starry night. From space, a sequence of millisecond-duration radio flashes are racing towards the dish, where they will be reflected and detected by the radio receivers. Such radio signals are called fast radio bursts, and Arecibo is the first telescope to see repeat bursts from the same source.A global team of astronomers, including one from  West Virginia University, have for the first time detected repeating short-duration bursts of radio waves from an enigmatic source which is likely located well beyond the edge of the Milky Way galaxy. The findings indicate that these “fast radio bursts,” or FRBs, come from an extremely powerful object which occasionally produces multiple bursts in under a minute.

West Virginia University invites educators to campus to discuss classroom success and inform policymakers March 5

While educators face the increasing challenge of shaping America's youth with decreasing budgets, West Virginia University is encouraging teachers to brainstorm ways to lessen the gap by sharing classroom success strategies and developing metrics to rethink how education spending and performance are linked.