View Site Map

Eberly News Blog

15 Apr

As part of its spring semester Geography Movie Night series, the Department of Geology and Geography will host a film screening and discussion of Pray the Devil Back to Hell on Thursday (April 17) at 6:30 p.m. in Brooks Hall, Room 202. Pray the Devil Back to Hell is the story of the Liberian women who took on the warlords and regime of dictator Charles Taylor in the midst of a brutal civil war, and won a once unimaginable peace for their shattered country in 2003. As the rebel noose tightened around the capital city of Monrovia, thousands of women – ordinary mothers, grandmothers, aunts and daughters, both Christian and Muslim – formed a thin but unshakeable line between the opposing forces. Gamma Theta Upsilon, Dr. Maria Perez, and Dr. Cynthia Gorman will assist as discussion moderators. Snacks will be provided.

15 Apr

As part of its spring semester Geography Movie Night series, the Department of Geology and Geography will host a film screening and discussion of Blood Diamond on Tuesday (April 15) at 7:30 p.m. in Brooks Hall, Room 202. The movie title refers to diamonds mined in African war zones and sold to finance conflicts, and thereby profit warlords and diamond companies across the world. Set during the Sierra Leone Civil War in 1996–2001, the film depicts a country torn apart by the struggle between government loyalists and insurgent forces. It also portrays many of the atrocities of that war, including the rebels’ amputation of people’s hands to discourage them from voting in upcoming elections. Gamma Theta Upsilon, Dr. Maria Perez, and Dr. Cynthia Gorman will assist as discussion moderators. Snacks will be provided.

11 Apr

Morgantown, W.Va- The extreme violence that permeated ancient Roman society may be well-documented by historians, but research by a professor at West Virginia University into the Roman empire’s legal system is yielding fascinating clues into what expectations citizens had of their government.

Ari Bryen ACLS

Ari Bryen, assistant professor of history, has been named a 2014-15 American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) fellow. He also received a Mellon Fellowship for Assistant Professors, and will spend a year at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, studying the legal cultures of the Roman world.

“The subjects of the Roman Empire were very interested in the rules under which they lived, and the people’s whose job it is to enforce them,” Bryen said.

“They spent a lot of time thinking about law, and making claims on the people who ruled over them. Yet no one has ever given them much credit as contributing to the development of their legal system as a whole. My project hopes to reconstruct these understandings, and show their effects.”

Bryen is the author of “Violence in Roman Egypt: A Study in Legal Interpretation,” which was printed by the University of Pennsylvania Press. He came to WVU after holding an ACLS New Faculty Fellowship in the Department of Rhetoric and Classics at UC Berkeley, and a Visiting Research Scholarship at NYU’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World.

ACLS fellowships support research in the humanities and humanistic social sciences. Recipients are selected through a multi-stage peer-review process and represent some of the best scholars in their fields. The ACLS fellowships provide salary replacement for scholars who are embarking on six to 12 months of full-time research and writing.

The program is funded by ACLS’s endowment, which has received contributions from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Council’s college and university Associates, past fellows and individual friends of ACLS.

For more information, contact Ari Bryen at ari.bryen@mail.wvu.edu.

-WVU-

gm/04/11/14

Check http://wvutoday.wvu.edu daily for the latest news from the University. Follow @WVUToday on Twitter.

11 Apr

Morgantown, W.Va.- Figuring out what ails you and how to cope can be a daunting task. But the road to good mental, emotional and physical health is available to those who are informed.

Maria Brann, associate professor in the department of communication studies, and her Health Communication Dissemination class focus on arming the public with the tools they need to make those informed decisions about their health.

On Tuesday, April 15, the class will host its first health communication fair from 11:30 a.m. until 1 p.m. in the Mountainlair on the Downtown Campus. Students, faculty and staff will be able to learn about leading healthier lifestyles through guided activities and displays.

“This health fair is completely student generated,” said Brann. “Undergraduate and graduate students have worked together to really address the needs of the community.”

Comm 509: Health Communication Dissemination is a dual-level course that focuses on health messaging. During the semester, students conduct health communication research, develop interventions and present their outcomes to community groups, schools, and at conferences and workshops.

“The materials are all original, and all messages have been tested with target audience members and adapted based on their feedback,” Brann added.

Among the interactive displays at the fair will be a booth with medical models allowing participants to feel for breast and testicular cancer lumps so that they’ll better understand self-examinations. There also will be quick, stress reducing techniques and time-management aids available to help with hectic, end-of-the-semester schedules.

“It has been a great learning experience for the students in class, and now the entire campus community will get to benefit from their hard work.”

For more information on the fair please contact Maria Brann at maria.brann@mail.wvu.edu.

-WVU-

gm/04/10/14

Check http://wvutoday.wvu.edu daily for the latest news from the University. Follow @WVUToday on Twitter.

11 Apr

MORGANTOWN, W.Va.— West Virginia University Department of History assistant professor Kimberly Welch has won a National Science Foundation Law and Social Sciences grant ($150,000) to support her research for an upcoming book on 19th century court cases involving African American litigants. She also has been awarded a year-long fellowship ($50,000) to support her project by the Newberry Library, funded by the Monticello College Foundation Fellowship for Women and the National Endowment for the Humanities; an American Academy of Arts and Sciences Fellowship ($35,000); and an NEH Summer Stipend Fellowship ($6,000).

Welch’s book, “Black Litigants: Rethinking Race and Power in the American South, 1820-1860,” is a historical and socio-legal study of free and enslaved African Americans’ use of the local courts in the antebellum American South.

Welch’s project investigates unpublished and rapidly deteriorating lower court records from the Natchez district of Mississippi and Louisiana between 1820 and 1860 in which free blacks and slaves sued whites and other African Americans.

“These are people who are not supposed to be in the legal record at all,” said Welch, “namely because they lack the legal standing to sue in court. What is more, this is a place where slavery was deeply entrenched and violently defended, and we don’t expect them to be able do this.”

“Southern lawmakers expended substantial effort to foreclose African Americans’ participation in the legal system,” Welch said. “They limited the political and legal rights of free people of color and denied enslaved men and women individual rights. Yet despite the limitations they faced, free blacks and slaves sued in court all the time.”

“I’ve found that African Americans sued whites and other blacks to enforce the terms of their contracts, recover unpaid debts, recuperate back wages, and claim damages for assault. They also sued in conflicts over cattle, land, slaves, and other property, for their freedom and for divorce, and to adjudicate a number of other disagreements,” Welch said.

Blacks not only sued whites (and other African Americans), but they often won these cases as well.

Research on this topic is difficult, however.

“That is part of the reason I think the NSF choose to fund the project,” said Welch. “None of the records are published or in any traditional archive. They are hidden away in the basements of local county courts. And they are rotting, falling apart, and handwritten, making them difficult to read and interpret. Working with them is like learning a new language.”

For more information on the grant or her book please contact Kimberly Welch by phone at 304.293.9302 or by email at Kimberly.Welch@mail.wvu.edu

-WVU-

Check http://wvutoday.wvu.edu/ daily for the latest news from the University.
Follow @WVUToday on Twitter.

10 Apr

The WVU Department of Psychology, and its Psi Chi Psychology Honorary and Psychology Club, will be hosting the 23rd Annual Tri-State Undergraduate Psychology Research Conference in the Mountainlair on Friday, April 11. The conference will feature posters and oral presentations from undergraduate student researchers, as well as other events including the Annual Intercollegiate Psychological Jeopardy Competition. This year’s keynote speaker will be Dr. Holly Wilcox from John Hopkins University, who will present “Epidemiology and Prevention of Suicide in Adolescents and Young Adults.” Wilcox will give his presentation from 1 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. in the Gluck Theatre in the Mountainlair.

10 Apr

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – For the fourth consecutive year students from the West Virginia University Department of Sociology and Anthropology will participate in the annual meetings of North Central Sociological Association (NCSA) in Cincinnati, Oh., April 10-13, presenting their research, participating in round-table discussions, and engaging in professional networking.

Seven graduate and one undergraduate student, along with seven department faculty members, will cover a diverse range of topics, covering many of the prominent areas within the social sciences, including social inequality; crime and deviance; violence; social attitude and perceptions; and social altruism.

Student presenters include Erin Bixler, Columbia, Pa.; Brent Boyd, Richmond, In.; Jason Contessa, Glendale, N.Y.; Lynsie Doty, New Martinsvile, W.Va.; Hannah Liebreich, Reynoldsburg, Oh.; Alle Ojjeh, Oakton, Va.; Bradley Silberzahn, Bel Air, Md.; and Angela Sycafoose, Beverly, W.Va.

Travel to the conference is being made possible thanks to generous financial support from the department, the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences, and the national sociology honorary Alpha Kappa Delta (AKD.) Not only a great resume builder, according to assistant professor and director of graduate studies Josh Woods, but the opportunities for professional interactions allow students to begin the vital process of networking which will follow them throughout their careers – whether that is in academic, private or public sectors.

“This really is a wonderful opportunity for our students – both graduate and undergraduate – to participate in professional meetings,” says Woods. “We’re very grateful for the financial support from the department and the Eberly College; many students are unable to attend national or regional conferences without this type of assistance. Thanks to the funding, we’ve been able to continually represent the university and the state of West Virginia.”

In addition to attending NCSA, Leibreich and fellow graduate student Barbara Prince, Seaford, N.Y., previously attended the annual meetings of the American Sociological Association in New York, N.Y. in part with funding from the Eberly College. Prince additionally attended the Eastern Sociological Association’s annual meetings in Baltimore, Md.

Boyd, Prince and Sycafoose will also be working with the chairs of their thesis committees to adapt their projects for submissions to peer-review journals as part of the department’s Summer Transition Grant, which provides funding to graduated students in the M.A. in Sociology program.

For more information, contact Joshua Woods, director of graduate studies in sociology, at 304-293-8843 or Joshua.Woods@mail.wvu.edu.

-WVU-

AF/04/10/14

Check http://wvutoday.wvu.edu daily for the latest news from the University. Follow @WVUToday on Twitter.

8 Apr

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – The Center for Literary Computing and the Department of World Languages, Literatures and Linguistics at West Virginia University will host a free digital writing mini-conference April 10-11.

The conference will feature the Laboratoire NT2 of the Université du Québec à Montréal, which is a leading center for studying digital writing.

“The NT2 lab at the Université du Québec à Montréal is on the cutting edge of the humanities and technology,” said Sandy Baldwin, associate professor of English and director of the Center for Literacy Computing.

“They are studying, cataloging, and celebrating new kinds of writing and art that take advantage of computers and networks. It is a privilege for WVU to be exposed to this exciting, world-class scholarship.”

Baldwin said he hopes those who attend the conference will leave with a better understanding about the diversity of electronic literature, particularly the Francophone electronic literature being studied by NT2.

Sessions at the conference include:

• “New Technologies/New Textualities Overview and Introduction of the NT2 Database”

• “The NT2 Infrastructure: Open source and Digital Humanities Projects and Achievements”

• “Translating Electronic Literature and a Very Short History of Québécois E-Lit”

• “Webcomics”

• “From the Hypermedia Directory at NT2 Laboratory-UQAM to the Online Observatory on the Contemporary Imagination: Talking from Experience”

• “The Consortium for Electronic Literature”

• “Workshop on NT2 database”

The Center for Literary Computing is housed within the Department of English. The department offers courses in digital writing, as well as a study abroad program in Portugal focusing on the topic.

WVU is home to the only book series focused on creative aspects of digital writing, featuring monographs by leading scholars. It is edited and produced by students in the department, and released and marketed through a distribution agreement with the WVU Press.

For more information on the conference, please contact Sandy Baldwin at Charles.Baldwin@mail.wvu.edu or by phone at 304-293-9703.

-WVU-

ma/04/08/14

Check http://wvutoday.wvu.edu daily for the latest news from the University. Follow @WVUToday on Twitter.

4 Apr

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – As the American workplace continues to become more high-tech, employees with strong backgrounds in mathematics and science will be in high demand. And, researchers say, a diverse population is needed to address society’s most pressing problems and make progress toward future advances.

To spark interests in these fields of study among girls, the Expanding Your Horizons conference will be held on Saturday April 12 in Hamblin Hall at West Virginia State University in Dunbar, WV. The conference is open to girls in grades 6-8.

Enthusiastic female mathematicians, scientists and engineers who serve as role models and possible future mentors, will share their knowledge and experience with the students and answer questions about science, technology, engineering, and math careers. Four fun and challenging hands-on activities will help the students discover the excitement in the growing fields of science and math.

Sample student workshops include: Soaring Science, Explore Mars, and Crash Course in Coding.

Free, adult workshops will also be available, including “The Admissions and Financial Aid Process,” and “How To Encourage Your Daughter’s Interest in Science.”

A light continental breakfast and a lunch will be provided.

The conference is sponsored by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, Division of Science and Research and organized by the West Virginia Chapter of the Association for Women in Science.

The keynote speaker will be Dr. Barbara Liedl, an Associate Research Professor with WVSU’s Gus R. Douglass Land Grant Institute. Leidl is a geneticist who is currently working on breeding greenhouse tomatoes for improved flavor and pest resistance.

Thanks to Expanding Your Horizons sponsors, the student fee is $5 and the adult program is free.

Space is limited. Registration deadline is Thursday, April 10.

Register online or download the registration form at: http://www.expandingyourhorizons.org/conferences/WestVirginia/.

For more information, contact Amy Keesee, AWIS-WV chapter president, at 304-293-5113 or amy.keesee@mail.wvu.edu.

-WVU-

ma/04/04/14

Check http://wvutoday.wvu.edu daily for the latest news from the University. Follow @WVUToday on Twitter.

2 Apr

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – The West Virginia University School of Social Work announces professional and community education programs for social workers and counselors who wish to earn continuing education credit.

Workshops in April and May will deal with a variety of topics aimed to help social service providers stay up-to-date on new developments in their fields.

Pre-registration forms and a brochure can be found online at http://socialwork.wvu.edu/ce.

Morgantown area workshops:

• April 3, 2014, “More Than Shy: Exploring the Highly-Sensitive Person
9 a.m. – 12 p.m., Monongalia General Hospital, Mylan Room, Morgantown, WV
Registration Fee: $35

• April 3, 2014, “Ethical Considerations When Working with persons with Disabilities”
1-5 p.m., Monongalia General Hospital, Mylan Room, Morgantown, WV
Registration Fee: $35

• April 14, 2014, “Resolving Difficult Situations in the Workplace
9 a.m.-4 p.m., Monongalia General Hospital, Mylan Room, Morgantown, WV
Registration Fee: $65

• April 23, 2014, “Let’s Be Trendy! Exploring New Trends in Non-Profit Board Management”
9 a.m.-12 p.m., Monongalia General Conference Center, Lynch/Piribeck Room, Morgantown, WV
Registration Fee: $35

• April 23, 2014, “Safety Concerns and Risk Management in Social Work”
1-4 p.m., Monongalia General Hospital Conference Center, Lynch/Piribeck Room, Morgantown, WV
Registration Fee: $35

Charleston area workshops:

• April 10, 2014: “Culture, Ethnicity and Race Matters”
9 a.m.-12 p.m., WVU – Charleston, Robert C. Byrd Health Science Center, Room 4020, Charleston, WV
Registration Fee: $35

• April 10, 2014: “Addressing the Issue of Bullying and Students With Disabilities: Perceptions, Perspectives and Prevention”
1-4 p.m., WVU – Charleston, Robert C. Byrd Health Science Center, Room 4020, Charleston, WV
Registration Fee: $35

Beckley area workshops:

• April 11, 2014: “Hoarding, Addiction, and Avoidance: Acceptance Commitment Therapy Perspectives”
9 a.m.-4 p.m., Beckley Raleigh Convention Center, Room C, Beckley, WV
Registration Fee: $65

• May 7, 2014: “Disability Etiquette: An Awareness”
9 a.m. – 12 p.m., Beckley Raleigh Convention Center, Room D, Beckley, WV
Registration Fee: $35 (Early bird rate of $31.50 by April 11, 2014)

• May 7, 2014: “Central and Rural Appalachian Culture”
1-4 p.m., Beckley Raleigh Convention Center, Room D, Beckley, WV
Registration Fee: $35 (Early bird rate of $31.50 by April 11, 2014)

Martinsburg area workshops:

• April 21, 2014: “Beyond the Here and Now: Developing Sustainable Practices for Strategic Action”
10 a.m.-4 p.m., WVU – Eastern Division, Erma Byrd Health Professions Center, Multimedia Room, Martinsburg, WV
Registration Fee: $55

• May 13, 2014: “Getting Our Hearts Right”
9 a.m.-4 p.m., WVU – Eastern Division, Erma Byrd Health Professions Center, Multimedia Room, Martinsburg, W.Va.
Registration Fee: $65 (Early bird rate of $58.50 by April 11, 2014)

Clarksburg/Bridgeport area workshops:

• April 25, 2014: “BEING Mindful of Ethics”
9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Days Inn, Bridgeport, W.Va.
Registration Fee: $60

• May 9, 2014: “Nonprofit and Governmental Organizations Under Fire”
10-11:30 a.m., Gaston Caperton Center, Room 308, Clarksburg, W.Va.
Registration Fee: $20 (Early bird rate of $18 by April 11, 2014)

• May 9, 2014: “Elderlaw 101”
12:30-3:30 p.m., Gaston Caperton Center, Room 308, Clarksburg, W.Va.
Registration Fee: $35 (Early bird rate of $31.50 by April 11, 2014)

Wheeling area workshops:

• April 17, 2014: “Families First: Help to Eliminate Destructive Behaviors”
9 a.m.-12 p.m., Ohio Valley Medical Center, Living Room, Wheeling, W.Va.
Registration Fee: $35

• April 17, 2014: “A New Frontier: The Way That Technological Developments Are Shaping Practice”
1-5 p.m., Ohio Valley Medical Center, Living Room,Wheeling, W.Va.
Registration Fee: $35

Keyser area workshops:

• May 16, 2014: “When Religion Hurts”
9 a.m.-4 p.m., WVU Potomac State, Heritage Room, University Place, Keyser, W.Va.
Registration Fee: $65 (Early bird rate of $58.50 by April 18, 2014)

Shepardstown area workshops:

• April 4, 2014: “Integrated Treatment of Co-Occurring Disorders: Clinical Strategies to Help Clients”
9 a.m.-4 p.m., Clarion Hotel and Conference Center, Shepherdstown, W.Va.
Registration Fee: $65

For more information, contact Jacki Englehardt, program coordinator of the Division of Social Work, at (304) 293-3280 or Jacki.Englehardt@mail.wvu.edu.

-WVU-

ma/04/02/14

Check http://wvutoday.wvu.edu daily for the latest news from the University. Follow @WVUToday on Twitter.

The views and opinions expressed in this page are strictly those of the page author(s) and comments and do not necessarily reflect the views of West Virginia University. Read more about WVU Blog Policies and Guidelines.